SEMPREX-D Reviews

Average Rating: 4.6 (5 Ratings)

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 COLD REMEDIES

 Type: Rx Drug
  

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Key to Ratings: 1=LOW (I would not recommend taking this medicine.)
5=HIGH (this medicine cured me or helped me a great deal.)

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RATING  REASONSIDE EFFECTS FOR SEMPREX-DCOMMENTSSEXAGEDURATION/
DOSAGE
DATE ADDED
 
 4  Hayfever Have used this drug under the Benadryl brand in the UK (Acrivastine). I have to say it has no noticeable side effects and I like the fact you are advised to take up to 3 capsules a day. Hopefully cheaper generic versions will be available once the patents expire! The second least side effects I find are with Cetirizine Hydrochloride. M 40 2 weeks
3X D
6/26/2019
 5  seasonal allergies/ hayfever No known side effects to date Very fast acting and has been great over the past five years. Becoming more and more expensive due to its availability in the U.S. The capsule is very small and easily swallowed. Through trial and error and after my Dr. tried everything, Semprex-D worked. No more miserable sneeze attacks or runny nose. Doesn't dry your sinuses out and just works well. M 36 5 years
8mg 1X D
9/7/2011
 5   I have tried all antihistamines and this is the best. There are no side effects I noticed... it sucks it took me forever to find this. Drug companies heavily promote allegra et al. Had to order it from UK. M 21 2 days
12/27/2007
 5  Hay Fever None. Works perfectly! Acrivastine (the active ingredient in Semprex-D) is also sold in the UK as 'Benadryl' and used as a hay fever remedy. I've found it extremely effective and side-effect free. Other antihistamines (especially loratadine) I find very hard to tolerate. Highly recommended. M 37 4 years
6/4/2007
 4  sinus congestion, fluid in ear This medicine did not cause any side effects during the day except for a dry mouth and slight buzz. But I think the acrivastine in this preparation kept me up til 4:30 am, after a capsule taken at 2 pm. This has happened every time I take this stuff. Pseudoephedrine alone can't do that. Any others having insomnia after taking Semprex-D early in the day, please comment, so I know it's not my imagination. It does a good job of clearing sinuses. So if it doesn't cause insomnia, it's a very good decongestant/antihistamine. F 52 4 days
5/6/2007
  

SEMPREX-D  (ACRIVASTINE; PSEUDOEPHEDRINE HYDROCHLORIDE):  This combination medication is used to temporarily relieve symptoms caused by the common cold, flu, allergies, or other breathing illnesses (such as sinusitis, bronchitis). Antihistamines help relieve watery eyes, itchy eyes/nose/throat, runny nose, and sneezing. Decongestants help to relieve stuffy nose and ear congestion symptoms. If you are self-treating with this medication, carefully read the package instructions to be sure it is right for you before you start using this product. Some products have similar brand names but different active ingredients with different uses. Taking the wrong product could harm you. Ask your pharmacist if you have any questions about your product or its use. Cough-and-cold products have not been shown to be safe or effective in children younger than 6 years. Therefore, do not use this product to treat cold symptoms in children younger than 6 years unless specifically directed by the doctor. Some products (including some long-acting tablets/capsules) are not recommended for use in children younger than 12 years. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more details about using your product safely. Do not use this product to make a child sleepy. These products do not cure or shorten the length of the common cold and may cause serious side effects. To decrease the risk for serious side effects, carefully follow all dosage directions. Do not give other cough-and-cold medication that might contain the same or similar ingredients (see also Drug Interactions section). Ask the doctor or pharmacist about other ways to relieve cough and cold symptoms (such as drinking enough fluids, using a humidifier or saline nose drops/spray).   (Sources: U.S. Centers for Medicare Services, FDA)

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